PowerCLI and VVols Part IV: Correlating a Windows NTFS to a VMDK

My last post in this series was about getting a VVol UUID and figuring out what volume on a FlashArray it is. But what about the step before that? If I have a guest OS file system how do I even figure out what VMDK it is? There is a basic option, which can potentially … Continue reading PowerCLI and VVols Part IV: Correlating a Windows NTFS to a VMDK

PowerCLI and VVols Part III: Getting VVol UUIDs from the FlashArray

The next step if you want to do correlation between a VMware VVol VMDK pointer and its corresponding FlashArray volume using PowerCLI. As a review, here are the previous posts in this series: PowerCLI and VVols Part I: Assigning a SPBM Policy PowerCLI and VVols Part II: Finding VVol UUIDs If you followed part 2, … Continue reading PowerCLI and VVols Part III: Getting VVol UUIDs from the FlashArray

PowerCLI and VVols Part II: Finding VVol UUIDs

One of the great benefits of VVols is that fact that virtual disks are just volumes on your array. So this means if you want to do some data management with your virtual disks, you just need to work directly on the volume that corresponds to it. The question is what virtual disk corresponds to … Continue reading PowerCLI and VVols Part II: Finding VVol UUIDs

PowerCLI and VVols Part I: Assigning a SPBM Policy

There are a variety of ways to assign and set a SPBM Policy to a VM. I recently put out a workflow package for vRO to everything VVols and Pure: vRealize Orchestrator VVol Workflow Package I also specifically blogged about assigning a policy to a VM with vRO: Assigning a VVol VM Storage Policy with … Continue reading PowerCLI and VVols Part I: Assigning a SPBM Policy

VMware Capacity Reporting Part V: VVols and UNMAP

Storage capacity reporting seems like a pretty straight forward topic. How much storage am I using? But when you introduce the concept of multiple levels of thin provisioning AND data reduction into it, all usage is not equal (does it compress well? does it dedupe well? is it zeroes?). This multi-part series will break it … Continue reading VMware Capacity Reporting Part V: VVols and UNMAP

vSpeaking Podcast Appearance: VVols

A few week ago I had the chance to stop by VMware HQ and catch up with some good friends at VMware. The highlight of the visit was doing an episode of the vSpeaking Podcast alongside VMware VVol engineering manager Patrick Dirks hosted by Pete Flecha and John Nicholson. Honored to be on the podcast … Continue reading vSpeaking Podcast Appearance: VVols

Getting Started with vRealize Orchestrator and VVols

Over the past few weeks, I have been working on writing a vRealize Orchestrator workflow package for Virtual Volumes and the FlashArray. While that is not quite ready to go out, I think some basics for starting to use vRO and VVols are worth noting. There are three main parts of using VVols with vRO: … Continue reading Getting Started with vRealize Orchestrator and VVols

VVols: A Whole New World for SQL Server Virtualization

Ah, VVols. The VMFS Datastore killer. And very soon, the RDM killer. Virtual Volumes (VVols) is a spec from VMware that allows storage vendors implement virtual disks as they see fit. On FlashArray, we’ve implemented VVols virtual disks as just regular volumes on the array. Think about what that means for a second. It means … Continue reading VVols: A Whole New World for SQL Server Virtualization

Do thin VVols perform better than thin VMDKs?

Yes. Any questions? Ahem, I suppose I will prove it out. The real answer is, well maybe. Depends on the array. So debates have raged on for quite some time around performance of virtual disk types and while the difference has diminished drastically over the years, eagerzeroedthick has always out-performed thin. And therefore many users … Continue reading Do thin VVols perform better than thin VMDKs?

Comparing VVols to VMDKs and RDMs

I have been talking a lot about Virtual Volumes (VVols) lately with customers and when I describe what they are a frequent response is “oh so basically RDMs then?”. .. …ugh sorry I just threw up in my mouth a bit… The answer to that is an unequivocal “no” of course, but the question deserves … Continue reading Comparing VVols to VMDKs and RDMs