VVols: A Whole New World for SQL Server Virtualization

Ah, VVols. The VMFS Datastore killer. And very soon, the RDM killer. Virtual Volumes (VVols) is a spec from VMware that allows storage vendors implement virtual disks as they see fit. On FlashArray, we’ve implemented VVols virtual disks as just regular volumes on the array. Think about what that means for a second. It means … Continue reading VVols: A Whole New World for SQL Server Virtualization

Do thin VVols perform better than thin VMDKs?

Yes. Any questions? Ahem, I suppose I will prove it out. The real answer is, well maybe. Depends on the array. So debates have raged on for quite some time around performance of virtual disk types and while the difference has diminished drastically over the years, eagerzeroedthick has always out-performed thin. And therefore many users … Continue reading Do thin VVols perform better than thin VMDKs?

Comparing VVols to VMDKs and RDMs

I have been talking a lot about Virtual Volumes (VVols) lately with customers and when I describe what they are a frequent response is “oh so basically RDMs then?”. .. …ugh sorry I just threw up in my mouth a bit… The answer to that is an unequivocal “no” of course, but the question deserves … Continue reading Comparing VVols to VMDKs and RDMs

Recovering a Deleted Virtual Machine with VVols

Virtual Volumes provide a great many benefits, some large, some small. Depending on the VM, recovering a deleted VM could be either of those. With traditional VMFS, once you have selected “delete from disk” restoring that VM could have been a process. Either restoring from backup or hoping you had a snapshot of the VMFS … Continue reading Recovering a Deleted Virtual Machine with VVols

What is a VVol Datastore?

I have been traveling around lately talking about VVols and one of the most commonly misunderstood objects is the VVol datastore. What is it? What does capacity mean on it? Why does it even exist? These are all good questions. The great thing about VVols is that very little changes in how the VMware user … Continue reading What is a VVol Datastore?

FlashArray 3.0 Plugin for the vSphere Web Client

This is the start of many blog posts around the recent Purity 5.0 release. I figured I would start with one that doesn’t require an upgrade of Purity to even get! Alongside Purity 5.0, we released the 3.0 version of theFlashArray plugin for the vSphere Web Client. This is bundled in Purity 5.0, so if … Continue reading FlashArray 3.0 Plugin for the vSphere Web Client

VVol Data Mobility: Data from Virtual to Physical

One of the most strategic benefits of Virtual Volumes is how it opens up your data mobility. Because there is no more VMDK encapsulation, VVols are just block volumes with whatever file system your guest OS in the VM puts on it. So a VVol is really just a volume hosting NTFS, or XFS or … Continue reading VVol Data Mobility: Data from Virtual to Physical

What is a Config VVol Anyways?

I have blogged a decent amount recently about VVols and in many of those posts I mention config VVols. When using vSphere Virtual Volumes, VMs have one, some, or all of the following VVols types: Data VVols–every virtual disk you add creates a data VVol on your array Swap VVol–when you power on a VVol-based … Continue reading What is a Config VVol Anyways?

VVol Lightboard Videos

Quick post. I did some light board videos together on vSphere Virtual Volumes. Lightboard videos are pretty fun to do, the unfortunate part is that I have horrible hand writing. So I immediately apologize for that. A common question I get with these videos is how do you write backwards. I don’t. I am nowhere … Continue reading VVol Lightboard Videos

Moving from an RDM to a VVol

Migrating VMDKs or virtual mode RDMs to VVols is easy: Storage vMotion. No downtime, no pre-creating of volumes. Simple and fast. But physical mode RDMs are a bit different. As we all begrudgingly admit there are still more than a few Raw Device Mappings out there in VMware environments. Two primary use cases: Microsoft Clustering. … Continue reading Moving from an RDM to a VVol