Tag Archives: PowerShell

Assigning Read Access to Windows Private Key

I have written about authenticating with the Pure1 REST API, and my PowerShell module in the past:

https://www.codyhosterman.com/2019/01/using-the-pure1-rest-api-part-i-powershell/

One of the issues is that if you followed my default instructions, you would need to run the PowerShell window as an admin to be able to create the connection. The answer–now that I think about it is fairly obvious: non-admin users (or admins not running in admin mode) don’t have security rights to it. Duh!

Continue reading Assigning Read Access to Windows Private Key

Revamped PowerShell Module for Pure and VMware

About 6 months ago, my esteemed colleague Barkz blogged about our path forward with PowerShell. We have an official PowerShell SDK for managing the FlashArray–but it is limited to that: doing stuff to the FlashArray.

So to add value and make managing it within context of the layers you actually manage your infrastructure from (VMware, Microsoft, etc.) we created some value-add PowerShell modules to make it easier. Barkz talks about them here:

Continue reading Revamped PowerShell Module for Pure and VMware

Pulling Performance Statistics from Pure1 with PowerShell

I have written a few posts recently on using the Pure1 with PowerShell, like below:

I made a PowerShell module you make it easy for you to use, which can be installed via install-module from the PowerShell gallery. Details here:

https://www.codyhosterman.com/scripts-and-tools/pure1-rest-api/pure1-powershell-module/

Continue reading Pulling Performance Statistics from Pure1 with PowerShell

Using the Pure1 PowerShell Module

Recently I wrote a blog post on how to authenticate and connect to Pure1 via PowerShell. You can find that here:

But it is fairly involved, so I made it easier for you (and me) by writing a PowerShell module and posted in on the PowerShell Gallery.

https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/Cody.PureStorage.Pure1/

Continue reading Using the Pure1 PowerShell Module

Using the Pure1 REST API Part I: PowerShell

In my last post, I spoke about the ins and outs of using the Pure1 REST API–but it was a fairly manual process. Which of course is not how you really want to use a REST API. So the first part of this series will be using it with one of my favorite tools: PowerShell!

I will separate this into five parts:

  1. Creating your certificate
  2. Adding your public key into Pure1
  3. Creating your JWT
  4. Authenticating with Pure1
  5. Making REST calls after authentication

UPDATE!!!! I made this much easier, you can use my module to connect to Pure1 which is on the PowerShell gallery.

You can find more information on it here:

https://www.codyhosterman.com/scripts-and-tools/pure1-rest-api/pure1-powershell-module/h

Continue reading Using the Pure1 REST API Part I: PowerShell

1.1.0.2 Release of the Pure Storage VMware PowerShell Module

I have released a new version of the VMware/Pure PowerShell module which can be automatically installed from the PowerShell Gallery.

Pure Storage PowerShell VMware Module

Updates in this release are focused on VVols. Creating VVol snapshots, copying them, creating new disks from them, retrieving them etc.

Version 1.1.0.2

I wrote a blog post below on using some of the new cmdlets:

PowerCLI and VVols Part V: Array Snapshots and VVols

Continue reading 1.1.0.2 Release of the Pure Storage VMware PowerShell Module

Pure Storage and VMware PowerShell Module

I see a fair amount of requests around how to do different things with VMware PowerCLI and the Pure Storage PowerShell SDK. How do I correlate a VMFS to a volume? How do I create a new VMFS? How do I expand? Etc.

To help our customers I have written a module that includes a lot of the common operations people might need to “connect” PowerCLI to our PowerShell SDK.

The module is called Cody.PureStorage.FlashArray.VMware. Continue reading Pure Storage and VMware PowerShell Module

PowerCLI and VVols Part IV: Correlating a Windows NTFS to a VMDK

My last post in this series was about getting a VVol UUID and figuring out what volume on a FlashArray it is. But what about the step before that? If I have a guest OS file system how do I even figure out what VMDK it is?

There is a basic option, which can potentially be used, which is correlating the bus ID and the unit ID of the device in the guest and matching it to what VMware displays for the virtual disks.

But that always felt to me as somewhat inexact.  What if you accidentally look at the wrong VM object and then do something to a volume you do not mean to? Or the opposite?

Not ideal. Luckily there is a more exact approach. I will focus this particular post on Windows. I will look at Linux in an upcoming one.

Continue reading PowerCLI and VVols Part IV: Correlating a Windows NTFS to a VMDK

VMware and FlashArray PowerShell GUI tool v2.7

Quick post. I updated my PowerShell GUI tool I maintain for VMware and FlashArray management and added some new features. This time mainly around protection group management. Download it from my GitHub page here:

https://github.com/codyhosterman/powercli/blob/master/PureStorageVMwareStorageTool.ps1

Continue reading VMware and FlashArray PowerShell GUI tool v2.7

Unattended VMFS UNMAP Script

I updated my UNMAP PowerCLI script a month or so ago and improved quite a few things–but I did remove hard-coded variables and replaced it with interactive input. Which is fine for some, but for many it was not.

Note: Move to VMFS-6 in vSphere 6.5 and you don’t have to worry about this UNMAP business anymore 🙂

Essentially, quite a few people want to run it as a scheduled task in Windows, and if it requires input that just isn’t going to work out of the box. So I have created an unattended version of the script. For details read on.

Note: I will continue to update the script (bugs, features, etc.) but will note them on my other blog post about the script here:

Pure Storage FlashArray UNMAP PowerCLI Script for VMware ESXi

I will only update this post if the unattended version changes in a way that makes these instructions wrong. Continue reading Unattended VMFS UNMAP Script